Newspaper, Identity Thief

So, true story.
I know identify theft is a serious matter, but really…
I’m heading out of the driveway and I see the newpaper delivery guy just pulling up.
He’s running a little late, but I figure I can still get the paper in time for morning reading on the Metro. 
I walk over to him and ask if I can get the Journal that he’s deliverying to me.
He says, “No, I only deliver the Wall Street Journal and the Post.”
I say, “Yeah, the Wall Street Journal, can I get it, since you’re running a little late this morning.”

He says. “I’m never late!”—actually, he is and sometimes doesn’t deliver at all (the other week, I got 3 papers in one day). 
I say, “OK, but I can take it from here.”
He says, “No, I only deliver to the door.”
I say, “But I’m right here.”
He says, “How do I know you are who you say you are?”
I say, “I am, and thank G-d, I really don’t need to steal a $2 newspaper from you, Sir.”
He says, “Okay, but I’ll need to see an id!”
I say, “Are you serious?”
He says, “Yeah,” pulling back to safety the pile of newspapers he is holding is his arms. 
Reluctantly, I flip open my wallet and flash my license to him.
Not good enough…he insists I take it out so he can read it. 
I finally got the paper, but we wasted what seemed like 5 minutes between the negotiation and proof of identity exercise. 
Don’t get me wrong, I appreciate his diligence, but I think this type of scrutiny over access and identity would be better placed squarely on our cyber assets—somewhere where we really need them! ;-)
(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal

Newspaper, Identity Thief

So, true story.


I know identify theft is a serious matter, but really…


I’m heading out of the driveway and I see the newpaper delivery guy just pulling up.


He’s running a little late, but I figure I can still get the paper in time for morning reading on the Metro. 


I walk over to him and ask if I can get the Journal that he’s deliverying to me.


He says, “No, I only deliver the Wall Street Journal and the Post.”


I say, “Yeah, the Wall Street Journal, can I get it, since you’re running a little late this morning.”

He says. “I’m never late!”—actually, he is and sometimes doesn’t deliver at all (the other week, I got 3 papers in one day). 


I say, “OK, but I can take it from here.”


He says, “No, I only deliver to the door.”


I say, “But I’m right here.”


He says, “How do I know you are who you say you are?”


I say, “I am, and thank G-d, I really don’t need to steal a $2 newspaper from you, Sir.”


He says, “Okay, but I’ll need to see an id!”


I say, “Are you serious?”


He says, “Yeah,” pulling back to safety the pile of newspapers he is holding is his arms. 


Reluctantly, I flip open my wallet and flash my license to him.


Not good enough…he insists I take it out so he can read it. 


I finally got the paper, but we wasted what seemed like 5 minutes between the negotiation and proof of identity exercise. 


Don’t get me wrong, I appreciate his diligence, but I think this type of scrutiny over access and identity would be better placed squarely on our cyber assets—somewhere where we really need them! ;-)


(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal

March Of The Dangerous Penguins

This was a funny picture on the streets of Washington D.C.
Someone drew these “armed” and dangerous penguins on the back of a chair. 
The chair is translucent, but with the snow coming down and covering it, you can see this crazy drawing. 
Perhaps this is a message from the local NRA advocating for gun rights, who knows?
Anyway, these penguins are cute little fellows even carrying scoped rifles and staring down the everyday passerbys. ;-)
(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

March Of The Dangerous Penguins

This was a funny picture on the streets of Washington D.C.


Someone drew these “armed” and dangerous penguins on the back of a chair. 


The chair is translucent, but with the snow coming down and covering it, you can see this crazy drawing. 


Perhaps this is a message from the local NRA advocating for gun rights, who knows?


Anyway, these penguins are cute little fellows even carrying scoped rifles and staring down the everyday passerbys. ;-)


(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

What A Waste Of Coin

Coming to work this week, I saw a penny on the ground…then another…and another.
I saw people passing the money, and instead of picking it up, they kicked in off the curb.
That’s even worse than throwing them into the fountain where at least you might get some good luck from it. 
Thus, the state of our minting of coinage—it’s essentially worthless.
After getting a pretty basic Venti Java Chip at Starbucks for a whopping $5.45, I quickly calculated, I would need 545 pennies,109 nickles, 54.5 dimes, or 21.8 quarters o pay for this—how ridiculous!  
And uh, how many of these would you need to pay someone one hour at the new proposed minimum wage of $10.10 if you did it in coins?
Otherwise, I could just give them a credit or debit card—yes, sort of a no brainer, right?
Why do we keep making coinage that no one wants or needs in the digital age?
We have direct deposit for payroll, automatic deductions for many expenses, online banking, ecommerce , credit and debit cards, paypal, and even bitcoin…let’s just be honest and admit it, traditional money is basically obsolete. 
At Starbucks, I see many people now just use their Smartphone App to pay and get rewards—another advance. 
Someday soon, we will have embedded chips that simply add and deduct payments as we go along and live life—it’s really not all that complicated. 
The funny thing also is that it costs more to make many coins then their intrinsic worth—and hence the drive towards making coins with cheaper materials. 
According to Business Insider, in 2012, a penny cost 2.4 cents to make and a nickle 11.2 cents—quite a losing proposition. 
While there truly are some valuable coins out there and I appreciate that there are many coin lovers and collectors—numismatists—perhaps there are alternate hobbies to consider. 
A colleague once told me that “If you watch your pennies, the dollars will follow”—and that may be some good investement advice, but in a 24/7 society and after decades of inflation, there isn’t enough time or room to collect all the pennies we would need to make much of a difference. 
ABC News reports that while our northern brother, Canada, got rid of the penny in 2012, we still make something like 5 billion of these useless things a year. 
Full disclosure: my first job in Washington, D.C. was for the U.S. Mint, and while there were good things about it, I could never feel good about the mission—it just had no purpose. ;-)
All Opinions my own.
(Source Photo: here with attribution to Maura Teague)

What A Waste Of Coin

Coming to work this week, I saw a penny on the ground…then another…and another.


I saw people passing the money, and instead of picking it up, they kicked in off the curb.


That’s even worse than throwing them into the fountain where at least you might get some good luck from it. 


Thus, the state of our minting of coinage—it’s essentially worthless.


After getting a pretty basic Venti Java Chip at Starbucks for a whopping $5.45, I quickly calculated, I would need 545 pennies,109 nickles, 54.5 dimes, or 21.8 quarters o pay for this—how ridiculous!  

And uh, how many of these would you need to pay someone one hour at the new proposed minimum wage of $10.10 if you did it in coins?


Otherwise, I could just give them a credit or debit card—yes, sort of a no brainer, right?


Why do we keep making coinage that no one wants or needs in the digital age?


We have direct deposit for payroll, automatic deductions for many expenses, online banking, ecommerce , credit and debit cards, paypal, and even bitcoin…let’s just be honest and admit it, traditional money is basically obsolete. 


At Starbucks, I see many people now just use their Smartphone App to pay and get rewards—another advance. 


Someday soon, we will have embedded chips that simply add and deduct payments as we go along and live life—it’s really not all that complicated. 


The funny thing also is that it costs more to make many coins then their intrinsic worth—and hence the drive towards making coins with cheaper materials. 


According to Business Insider, in 2012, a penny cost 2.4 cents to make and a nickle 11.2 cents—quite a losing proposition. 


While there truly are some valuable coins out there and I appreciate that there are many coin lovers and collectors—numismatists—perhaps there are alternate hobbies to consider. 


A colleague once told me that “If you watch your pennies, the dollars will follow”—and that may be some good investement advice, but in a 24/7 society and after decades of inflation, there isn’t enough time or room to collect all the pennies we would need to make much of a difference. 


ABC News reports that while our northern brother, Canada, got rid of the penny in 2012, we still make something like 5 billion of these useless things a year. 


Full disclosure: my first job in Washington, D.C. was for the U.S. Mint, and while there were good things about it, I could never feel good about the mission—it just had no purpose. ;-)


All Opinions my own.

(Source Photo: here with attribution to Maura Teague)

Google Fiber 4 The Nation’s Capital

How About Google Fiber for Washington, D.C.? 
- Lead, by example, the rest of the nation forward.
- Speed up the functioning of the government.
- Helpful for Emergency Management
- The Patriotic thing to do! ;-)
All Opinions my own. 
(Source Photo: here with attribution to Cameron Yee, & no idea why it’s in Spanish, but I like it!)

Google Fiber 4 The Nation’s Capital

How About Google Fiber for Washington, D.C.? 


- Lead, by example, the rest of the nation forward.


- Speed up the functioning of the government.


- Helpful for Emergency Management


- The Patriotic thing to do! ;-)


All Opinions my own. 


(Source Photo: here with attribution to Cameron Yee, & no idea why it’s in Spanish, but I like it!)

Tie Dye Cake

This is a fun cooking experience.


We’re making tie dye cake.


It’s not yet done—just went into the oven.


Frosting and sprinkles are also on the way. 


In 30 minutes we’ll have a very colorful dessert. 


And yum!  ;-)


(Source Photos: Andy Blumenthal)

Don’t Let Debbie Downer Take You Down

Saturday Night Live has a spoof about Negative Nellie’s and they call her Debbie Downer. 


We all know people like this who are the Voice of Doom and the Doctor No’s.


Whatever the topic is—they’ve been there, done it, and have seen it fail—“We tried that before,” “That’s not the way we do things here,” “You just don’t understand,” “It will never work.”


They see danger and bad everywhere and in everything, even in the face of positive and promise. 


These are the people who are obstinate, the naysayers, and are against change at all cost—they fear it or just don’t want to deal with it. 


BusinessWeek has an interesting perspective on this—how even these people can be employed to have a beneficial impact on projects—by having them tell you everything that can go wrong, so you can take steps to plan and mitigate against these. 


Some people only want to have positive people around them—“yes men,” who only tell them how smart and right they are all the time. 


However, the best leaders don’t want kiss ups and brown nosers, but rather value”truth tellers,” who will provide them solid advice and guidance on issues, tell them when they think something is wrong or risky, and even take an opposing point of view or play devil’s advocate.


I remember when I was asked about whether a certain project was going to meet a very near deadline, and I said point blank, “Do you want me just to say yes or do you want me to tell you the truth?”


I got a big smile to that and the appreciation that I was real and truthful and there to make a difference and not just be another lump on the log. 


The point is not to be a Debbie Downer or a brown noser, but to be an Honest Joe or Jane. ;-)

National State Of Cyber Insecurity

This video is a wake up call on the state of our national cyber insecurity. 


It is the opening statement (about 6 minutes) of Chairman Michael McCaul (R-TX) of the Homeland Security Subcommittee of Oversight, Investigations, and Management.


What he describes is quite grave and every American should listen carefully about the state of our cyber insecurity that poses a real and significant threat to our economy and national security.


We are under attack by cyber criminals, terrorists, and hostile nation states. 


Our adversaries seek to and can paralyze our critical infrastructure, steal our intellectual property, conduct espionage, and access our personal and financial information. 


The collapse of our military networks, financial system, energy, transportation, and electricity “is not science fiction.”


The cyber attacks are “real, stealth, and persistent, and can devastate our nation.” 


It is “not a matter of if, but when a Cyber Pearl Harbor will occur.”


And “we have been fortunate that up until this point that cyber attacks on our country have not caused a cataclysmic event.”


I read from the Center for Strategic and International Studies (2011) that cybersecurity has taken a back seat after 9/11 to the War on Terror as well as the economic fight after the recession of 2008, with the result that “the United States is unprepared to defend itself.”


Chairman McCaul critically states at the end of his opening statement, “Let’s do something meaningful [now] because it is not a tolerable situation!”

Can You Trust Social Media?

Interesting article in BBC about a project underway to develop a system that will rate information on the Internet as trustworthy or not. 
Considering how quickly we get information from the Net and how easy it is to start crazy rumors, manipulate financial investors, or even cause a near panic, it would be good to know whether the source is legitimate and the information has been validated. 
Are we simply getting someone mouthing off on their opinions or what they think may happen or perhaps they are unknowingly spreading false information (misinformation) or even purposely doing it (disinformation)? 
Depending how the Internet is being used—someone may be trying to get the real word out to you (e.g. from dissidents in repressive regimes) or they may be manipulating you (e.g. hackers, criminals, or even terrorists). 
To have a reliable system that tells us if information being promulgated is good or not could add some credibility and security online. 
What if that system though itself is hacked? Then lies can perhaps be “verified” as truth and truth can be discredited as falsehood. 
The Internet is dangerous terrain, and as in the life in general, it is best to take a cautious approach to verify source and message. 
The next cyber or kinetic attack may start not with someone bringing down the Internet, but rather with using it to sow confusion and disarm the masses with chaos. ;-)
(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

Can You Trust Social Media?

Interesting article in BBC about a project underway to develop a system that will rate information on the Internet as trustworthy or not. 


Considering how quickly we get information from the Net and how easy it is to start crazy rumors, manipulate financial investors, or even cause a near panic, it would be good to know whether the source is legitimate and the information has been validated. 


Are we simply getting someone mouthing off on their opinions or what they think may happen or perhaps they are unknowingly spreading false information (misinformation) or even purposely doing it (disinformation)? 


Depending how the Internet is being used—someone may be trying to get the real word out to you (e.g. from dissidents in repressive regimes) or they may be manipulating you (e.g. hackers, criminals, or even terrorists). 


To have a reliable system that tells us if information being promulgated is good or not could add some credibility and security online. 


What if that system though itself is hacked? Then lies can perhaps be “verified” as truth and truth can be discredited as falsehood. 


The Internet is dangerous terrain, and as in the life in general, it is best to take a cautious approach to verify source and message. 


The next cyber or kinetic attack may start not with someone bringing down the Internet, but rather with using it to sow confusion and disarm the masses with chaos. ;-)


(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

Jewish History At A Glance

I really like this poster graphic outlining Jewish history and key figures from Genesis until modern times. 
While there is already a lot of information on here such major events in Jewish history, world events, Jewish historical figures, Jewish literature and Jewish population, I would suggest adding major Jewish contributions to the world from Einstein to Freud, from Columbis to Salk. 

Also, I found that 23% of all Noble Prizes (or 193 people) between 1901 and 2013 were awarded to people of Jewish descent—and the awards were across the fields of chemistry, economics, literature, peace, physics, and medicine. 
We are not a very large people—just .2%—in terms of population, but we have a very rich history—a mixture of persecution and contribution. 
Thank you Minna Blumenthal for sending me the link to this!
(Source Photo: here with attribution to Odyeda)

Jewish History At A Glance

I really like this poster graphic outlining Jewish history and key figures from Genesis until modern times. 


While there is already a lot of information on here such major events in Jewish history, world events, Jewish historical figures, Jewish literature and Jewish population, I would suggest adding major Jewish contributions to the world from Einstein to Freud, from Columbis to Salk. 

Also, I found that 23% of all Noble Prizes (or 193 people) between 1901 and 2013 were awarded to people of Jewish descent—and the awards were across the fields of chemistry, economics, literature, peace, physics, and medicine. 


We are not a very large people—just .2%—in terms of population, but we have a very rich history—a mixture of persecution and contribution. 


Thank you Minna Blumenthal for sending me the link to this!


(Source Photo: here with attribution to Odyeda)

Alert, Alert, And More Alerts

No this is not an alert, but some strategic thinking about alerts. 
As a kid, we get our first alerts usually from the fire alarm going off in school and practicing the buddy system and safely evacuating. 
As adults, we are used to get so many types of alerts:
- Homeland Security threat alerts
- Breaking news alerts
- Emergency/Disaster alerts
- Severe weather alerts
- Smog alerts
- Transportation delay alerts
- Accident alerts
- Fraud alerts
- Economic and financial alerts
- Amber missing child alerts
- Internet security alerts
- Power loss alerts
- Home or business intruder alerts
- Fire alerts
- Carbon Monoxide alerts
- Medical/health alerts
- Chemical spill alerts
- Product safety or recall alerts
- Unsafe drinking water alerts
- Active shooter alerts
- Work closure alerts
- Parking garage alerts
- Dangerous marine life alerts
- Dangerous current or undertow alerts
- Air raid siren alerts
- Solar eclipse alerts
- Meteorite or falling space debris alerts
- Special sale or promotional event alerts
With the arrival of highly successful, mass social media applications like Twitter, we have alerts aggregated for us and listed chronologically as things are happening real-time. 
The brilliance of the current Twitter-type alerting is that we can sign up to follow whatever alerts we are interested in and then have a streaming feed of them.  
The alerts are short—up to 140 characters—so you can quickly see the essence of what is happening or ignore what is irrelevant to you. 
When more space is needed to explain the details behind an alert, typically a (shortened) URL is included, which if you click on it takes you to a more in depth explanation of the event or item. 
So alerts are a terrific balance between short, attention grabbing headlines and links to more detail, as needed. 
What is also great about the current alerting mechanism is that you can provide concise alert information, including:
- Message source (for ensuring reliability)
- Guidance (for providing immediate instruction on response). 
- Hazard (for specifying the type of incident)
- Location (for identifying geographic or mapping locality)
- Date/time (for implications as to its currency)
- Importance (for determining severity such as catastrophic, critical, etc.)
While we remain ever, hyper-vigilant, we need to be careful not to become anxiety-ridden, or at some point, simply learn to tune it all out, so we can actually live life and get stuff done.
It’s good to know what’s going on out there, but can too much information ever become a bad thing? ;-)
(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

Alert, Alert, And More Alerts

No this is not an alert, but some strategic thinking about alerts. 


As a kid, we get our first alerts usually from the fire alarm going off in school and practicing the buddy system and safely evacuating. 


As adults, we are used to get so many types of alerts:


- Homeland Security threat alerts

- Breaking news alerts

- Emergency/Disaster alerts

- Severe weather alerts

- Smog alerts

- Transportation delay alerts

- Accident alerts

- Fraud alerts

- Economic and financial alerts

- Amber missing child alerts

- Internet security alerts

- Power loss alerts

- Home or business intruder alerts

- Fire alerts

- Carbon Monoxide alerts

- Medical/health alerts

- Chemical spill alerts

- Product safety or recall alerts

- Unsafe drinking water alerts

- Active shooter alerts

- Work closure alerts

- Parking garage alerts

- Dangerous marine life alerts

- Dangerous current or undertow alerts

- Air raid siren alerts

- Solar eclipse alerts

- Meteorite or falling space debris alerts

- Special sale or promotional event alerts


With the arrival of highly successful, mass social media applications like Twitter, we have alerts aggregated for us and listed chronologically as things are happening real-time. 


The brilliance of the current Twitter-type alerting is that we can sign up to follow whatever alerts we are interested in and then have a streaming feed of them.  


The alerts are short—up to 140 characters—so you can quickly see the essence of what is happening or ignore what is irrelevant to you. 


When more space is needed to explain the details behind an alert, typically a (shortened) URL is included, which if you click on it takes you to a more in depth explanation of the event or item. 


So alerts are a terrific balance between short, attention grabbing headlines and links to more detail, as needed. 


What is also great about the current alerting mechanism is that you can provide concise alert information, including:


- Message source (for ensuring reliability)

- Guidance (for providing immediate instruction on response). 

- Hazard (for specifying the type of incident)

- Location (for identifying geographic or mapping locality)

- Date/time (for implications as to its currency)

- Importance (for determining severity such as catastrophic, critical, etc.)


While we remain ever, hyper-vigilant, we need to be careful not to become anxiety-ridden, or at some point, simply learn to tune it all out, so we can actually live life and get stuff done.


It’s good to know what’s going on out there, but can too much information ever become a bad thing? ;-)

(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

Some Mighty Big Shoes To Fill

If you’re ever feeling like a big shot—remember there are always others out there who are bigger than you. 

_________________________
We walk in the footsteps of the giants who came before us. 
We walk among colleagues who are superior to us.
We walk before future generations who will certainly humble us. 
We walk in the sight of G-d, our creator and master, who bestows all divine benevolence to us. 
_________________
Now those are some mighty big shoes! ;-)
(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

Some Mighty Big Shoes To Fill

If you’re ever feeling like a big shot—remember there are always others out there who are bigger than you. 

_________________________


We walk in the footsteps of the giants who came before us. 


We walk among colleagues who are superior to us.


We walk before future generations who will certainly humble us. 


We walk in the sight of G-d, our creator and master, who bestows all divine benevolence to us. 


_________________


Now those are some mighty big shoes! ;-)


(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

How Our Colony On Mars Will Get Built

Absolutely amazing development in robotics…


According to the Wall Street Journal, Harvard University researchers have developed autonomous robots inspired by termites or ants. 


They can build complex structures by working in a group or swarm.


Each robot is independent, yet by being programmed with the target structure, they work harmoniously together to build the structure without further guidance. 


They have sensors along with a set of rules that enable them to interact with each other and the environment to get the job done. 


They can even build stairs to enable themselves to get to higher levels of the structure and add the next set of building bricks. 


The robots are 8” by 4.5” with pinwheel tires for traction and are powered by off-the-shelf motors.


"Each robot ‘walks around the structure until it sees something that needs to be done and then does it…they can recognize errors and correct them.’"


Perhaps, the robots can not only learn from the termites, but we can learn from the robots. ;-)

Another Day In The Middle East

It can be hard for a regular person to understand the course of events in the Middle East—I certainly don’t!
I recognize that I don’t know what I don’t know, but with all due respect, it would be great if we could all better understand where we are going there. 
- On the 9/11, we were attacked by Al Qaeda hijackers, 15 of 19 of whom were Saudi Arabian, yet after 9/11, we didn’t go after Saudi Arabia, but instead overthrew Saddam Hussein in Iraq.
- However, early in the 1980’s Iran-Iraq War, we supported Iraq against Iran and permitted the sale of American arms to Hussein. 
- By overthrowing Saddam, in effect we established a Shiite-lead Iraq, right next to a fundamentalist Shiite Iran with a history of conflict with America. 
- In subsequent conflicts, it is not clear whether we are supporting the secularists or the fundamentalists:
a) In Syria, we have been supporting “moderate” Sunni’s (although often seen aligned to Al Qaeda) against Bashar al-Assad, and what is considered the “secular Ba’ath party.”
b) In Egypt, we withheld military and economic support after the overthrew of the Muslim Brotherhood, whose aims include establishing a state ruled by Sharia law, and an organization that is aligned with Hamas and Hezbollah, both listed as terrorist organizations. 
- In Iran, in an attempt to move towards peaceful nuclear disarmament, we are relaxing sanctions on a country that former President George W. Bush, in his State of the Union, declared part of the Axis of Evil (2002), and with an agreement that is viewed as not better than having a 50-50 chance of success. 
If you find this a lot to take in, you are not alone. ;-)

All opinions my own. 
(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

Another Day In The Middle East

It can be hard for a regular person to understand the course of events in the Middle East—I certainly don’t!


I recognize that I don’t know what I don’t know, but with all due respect, it would be great if we could all better understand where we are going there. 


- On the 9/11, we were attacked by Al Qaeda hijackers, 15 of 19 of whom were Saudi Arabian, yet after 9/11, we didn’t go after Saudi Arabia, but instead overthrew Saddam Hussein in Iraq.


- However, early in the 1980’s Iran-Iraq War, we supported Iraq against Iran and permitted the sale of American arms to Hussein. 


- By overthrowing Saddam, in effect we established a Shiite-lead Iraq, right next to a fundamentalist Shiite Iran with a history of conflict with America. 


- In subsequent conflicts, it is not clear whether we are supporting the secularists or the fundamentalists:


a) In Syria, we have been supporting “moderate” Sunni’s (although often seen aligned to Al Qaeda) against Bashar al-Assad, and what is considered the “secular Ba’ath party.”


b) In Egypt, we withheld military and economic support after the overthrew of the Muslim Brotherhood, whose aims include establishing a state ruled by Sharia law, and an organization that is aligned with Hamas and Hezbollah, both listed as terrorist organizations


- In Iran, in an attempt to move towards peaceful nuclear disarmament, we are relaxing sanctions on a country that former President George W. Bush, in his State of the Union, declared part of the Axis of Evil (2002), and with an agreement that is viewed as not better than having a 50-50 chance of success


If you find this a lot to take in, you are not alone. ;-)

All opinions my own. 

(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

She’s Got Bling

My daughter, Rebecca is usually very earthy. 
However, I convinced her to get these “bling” sneakers from Guess. 
It was out of her usual comfort zone, but it took her about 3 minutes to admit it—she loves ‘em!
Good job Daddy. ;-)
(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

She’s Got Bling

My daughter, Rebecca is usually very earthy. 


However, I convinced her to get these “bling” sneakers from Guess. 


It was out of her usual comfort zone, but it took her about 3 minutes to admit it—she loves ‘em!


Good job Daddy. ;-)


(Source Photo: Andy Blumenthal)

Snow, No Snow

Great photograph by my daughter, Michelle Blumenthal. 
Washington, D.C. area digging out of Snowmageddon 2014. 
Talking about taking the middle-of-the-road approach… ;-)

Snow, No Snow

Great photograph by my daughter, Michelle Blumenthal. 


Washington, D.C. area digging out of Snowmageddon 2014. 


Talking about taking the middle-of-the-road approach… ;-)